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Q: How long should I eat for?

It takes about 20 minutes from the start of eating for your brain to receive signals of fullness from the gastrointestinal tract. So eat each meal for at least 20 minutes to allow time for your body to tell you that you are full! If you eat for less than 20 minutes you are likely to miss these signals of fullness and eat more than what your body requires. Click on the image below to find out how :)

23 Ways to Improve Your Food Environment

Firstly we have to understand what is a food cue. Food cues are not just the sight and smell of real food in front of you but also includes pictures, videos of foods, food advertisements, thoughts of food, emotions, places, people and situations. Over time from repeatedly eating after exposure to food cues, these food cues evokes a conditioned response of preparing the body for digestion (increasing salivation, heart rate, gastric activity, neural activity) influencing eating behaviour and weight. There has been recent investigations on the similarities between food cues and drug cues in activating reward regions, assigning values to these rewards and therefore signalling actions. So how doe

Q: How long should I eat for?

It takes about 20 minutes from the start of eating for your brain to receive signals of fullness from the gastrointestinal tract. So eat each meal for at least 20 minutes to allow time for your body to tell you that you are full! If you eat for less than 20 minutes you are likely to miss these signals of fullness and eat more than what your body requires. Click on the image below to find out how :)

23 Ways to Improve Your Food Environment

Firstly we have to understand what is a food cue. Food cues are not just the sight and smell of real food in front of you but also includes pictures, videos of foods, food advertisements, thoughts of food, emotions, places, people and situations. Over time from repeatedly eating after exposure to food cues, these food cues evokes a conditioned response of preparing the body for digestion (increasing salivation, heart rate, gastric activity, neural activity) influencing eating behaviour and weight. There has been recent investigations on the similarities between food cues and drug cues in activating reward regions, assigning values to these rewards and therefore signalling actions. So how doe

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